Focus on what you do best.
For tax and legal issues, our city part­ners can help you pro­fes­sion­ally.

Inter­pret­ing as a side job

An easy way to start as an inter­preter is the ger­man “Klei­n­un­ternehmer Reglung”. This is offered by the ger­man tax office, as over­sim­pli­fied method of entry into self-​​employment. Self-​​employed indi­vid­ual inter­preters (Freiberu­fliche Einzelun­ternehmer) do not have to reg­is­ter for a trade (Gewerbe). It is suf­fi­cient to reg­is­ter the free­lance work (freiberu­fliche Tätigkeit) at the ger­man tax office.

How does the free­lance with “Klei­n­un­ternehmer Reglung” works and how do I write an invoice? Buy a bill tem­plate block at the sta­tionery store or down­load a tem­plate as a PDF, Form­blitz for exam­ple.  All advan­tages can be found here in a nut­shell.


Full time as an inter­preter

If your turnover is more than 17500 € a year, our city part­ner Grün­der Advise  can sup­port you with found­ing ques­tions. Self-​​employed indi­vid­ual inter­preters (Freiberu­fliche Einzelun­ternehmer) do not have to reg­is­ter for a trade (Gewerbe). It is suf­fi­cient to reg­is­ter the free­lance work (freiberu­fliche Tätigkeit) at the ger­man tax office.

For more infor­ma­tion, con­tact the BDÜ Pro­fes­sional Asso­ci­a­tion of Pro­fes­sional Inter­preters and Trans­la­tors, your local IHK or a tax con­sul­tant.

Yes Sir! is obliged to charge VAT on our ser­vices in coun­tries that tax elec­tron­i­cally pro­vided ser­vices. At present this applies to the fol­low­ing coun­tries; all coun­tries in the EU, Alba­nia, Ice­land, Nor­way, Switzer­land, South Africa.